Decolonizing Curatorial Pedagogies workshop makes connections

Photo of gallery tour

Curator Alex Nahwegahbow leads workshop participants on a tour of her exhibit “Temporal Re-Imaginings.” (photo credit: Lauren Bosc)

Students, researchers, museum workers, and other members of Ottawa’s cultural communities gathered together from April 15-16, 2016 to discuss ways of “decolonizing curatorial pedagogies” at a workshop of the same name organized by Dr. Monica Patterson (Carleton University) and the Thinking through the Museum team.

The workshop included a visit to the Canadian Museum of History, student presentations on curatorial possibilities, a keynote address by Dr. Amy Lonetree (University of California, Santa Cruz), an interview with curator Alex Nahwegahbow and art educator Sylvia Dreaver (Dueck), roundtable discussions, and an Indigenous walking tour led by artist Jaime Koebel.

The full program and workshop itinerary, photo galleries, and video recordings will be available soon under the Workshops section of this website. Photos and responses can also be found by searching #decolonizingcuratorialpedagogies on Twitter!

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Dr. Failler speaks on “Eat Your Arts & Vegetables” (CKUW 95.9 FM Winnipeg)

Image of Dr. Failler at CKUW

Dr. Angela Failler at CKUW (photo credit: Eat Your Arts & Vegetables)

On December 3, 2015, research team member Dr. Angela Failler spoke with radio hosts Aleem Khan and Derek Brueckner on Eat Your Arts & Vegetables. This show, which broadcasts from the University of Winnipeg’s campus radio station, CKUW 95.9 FM, presents guests of diverse backgrounds and perspectives ranging from local self taught artists to internationally renowned interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary artists. The show’s mandate offers artists, curators, art academics, cultural workers and organizations a resource to promote their work and ideas in conjunction with current local art events.

Dr. Failler spoke about her research work over the past few years on the Canadian Museum for Human rights and working through “difficult knowledge” in relation to the Thinking through the Museum project.

Listen now to part one (interview begins at 2:30):

Continuing listening here (interview ends at 3:20):

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